Nationwide Vehicle Leasing
At Affordable Rates
alt tag
BVRLA's 10 Reasons To
Choose Applied Leasing

FREE PHONE

 0800 525 209

Mon to Fri: 9.00am - 6.00pm

Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)

Diesel Particulate Filter, what is it and how does it work?

How does it work?

When the soot in the filter reaches a set limit the Engine Control Unit (ECU) will trigger a regeneration process to burn this soot off. If the journey is a bit stop/start or you take your foot off the accelerator while the regeneration is in progress, it may not complete and the warning light will come on to show that the filter is partially blocked. 

It should generally be possible to start a complete regeneration and clear the warning light by driving for approx 10 minutes at speeds greater than 40mph. 

However, please note, you should always refer to your particular vehicle’s handbook for vehicle specific information.

Expensive Repairs

If you ignore the warning light and keep driving in a relatively slow, stop/start pattern, soot loading will continue to build up and you can expect to see other dashboard warning lights start to come on too. At this point driving at speed alone will not be enough and you will have to take the car to a dealer for regeneration. If you continue to ignore warnings and soot loading keeps increasing then the car won’t run properly and the most likely outcome will be that you will have to get a new DPF costing at least £1000.

Check the handbook

It is suggested from time to time that the answer to failed DPF regeneration is get the DPF removed from the exhaust system rather than pay to get it repaired/renewed. Indeed there are companies advertising just such a service including reprogramming of the engine management software, but is it legal? 

DPFs are fitted to meet European emissions regulations designed to reduce vehicle emissions of particulate matter (soot) associated with respiratory disease and cancer. 

According to the Department for Transport, it is an offence under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 to use a vehicle which has been modified in such a way that it no longer complies with the air pollutant emissions standards it was designed to meet. Removal of a DPF will almost invariably contravene these requirements, making the vehicle illegal for road use.

MOT 

From February 2014 the inspection of the exhaust system carried out during the MOT test will include a check for the presence of a DPF. A missing DPF, where one was fitted when the vehicle was built, will result in an MOT failure.

alt tagalt tagalt tagalt tagalt tagalt tagalt tag